Twitter Analytics - for all!

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By: Neal Dyer on 30th September 2014, 4 minute read

Wish you could see what your tweets are doing? Previously only available to verified Twitter users and those participating in promoted Twitter advertising, all users can now see the effectiveness of their tweets.

The recently unlocked activity dashboard gives insight into the performance of individual tweets, followers and overall account performance - for FREE!

What can I see?

Tweets

The first thing you will see when you login is a list of your tweets, starting with the most recent:

Here you can see the number of times users saw your tweet and how many times a user physically engaged with the tweet (retweet, favourite, link click etc.).

Followers

Here you can get a really good insight into your followers; their interests, location and gender:

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Why does that matter?

If you are going after a certain clientele, then naturally, you want them to be following you. For example, what's the point in being primarily followed by male users whose interests are in the sporting arena, if you're a retailer who sells high-street fashion women's clothing?

Twitter Cards

Again, similar to monitoring the performance of your tweets, you can see how well your Twitter Cards are doing. Here it is possible to measure URL clicks.

Overview

There are also a couple of really useful overview bar charts, which let you look at your twitter performance from a daily and monthly point of view. Furthermore, they tell you how your current performance rates against your previous performance.

Great, now what?

The real benefit of Twitter analytics is that it tells you what is and isn't working, and where your focus needs to be.

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An online retailer of mobile device repairs and replacement parts

Here are a few things you can do to help increase engagement:

Time

Is there a particular time of the day where your posts do better than other times e.g. are you getting a better reaction at tweets sent at midday then you are in the evening? Or vice versa?

Frequency

Are you posting too much or not enough? Is your voice getting lost in the clutter of others? Are you tweeting so often that its clogging up users Twitter account?

Hashtags

You might be producing great content, but not enough people are getting to see it. Remember, it's not only those that are following you who can see your tweets. By using relevant and popular hashtags, you reach a wider audience. For example, you're talking about a subject, but you're not directly referencing the subject in the text. Here's an example:

The subject matter is #FinTech, but the term isn't referenced in the text. By adding it in as a hashtag, you will reach a wider audience, as well as adding context.

Tone of voice

Is your tone of voice right? If you're adding a link to your tweet, you naturally want people to click it. So the trick here is to only give a teaser of what you want to say - like a newspaper headline. If you're giving away all the information in the tweet, why would anyone bother clicking to read more?

Or, you could introduce a ‘call to action' to try and elicit a click e.g. ‘find out more', ‘click here' etc.

Video/photos

Could your tweets do with an added spark? Adding a photo or a video may do a better job of grabbing the attention of Twitter users.

Twitter is a very powerful tool. A tool that has now been made more manageable and accountable thanks to the introduction of analytics. If you need help with anything discussed in this blog post, feel free to get in touch.

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Neal Dyer

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Neal Dyer

Our leader in CRM and Marketing Automation, Neal is responsible for The Marketing Eye being recognised as one of the few Platinum Certified SharpSpring agencies in the UK.

Campaign Manager / The Marketing Eye

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